Resistence Training

Resistence Training

Increasing participation in youth sports, has created a desire for young athletes to use resistance training to help them achieve peak performance. Recent evidence dispels the myths that weightlifting in children is dangerous as the result of growth plate injury risk and ineffective because children are unable to increase strength or muscle mass. Supervised resistance training currently is recognized to be safe and effective, and it also may reduce injury risk during sports participation in young athletes.Resistance training is now accepted as an integral and crucial part of any athlete’s training plan…  Unlike the generic strength training routines found in fitness magazines, sport-specific strength conditioning involves a few more design variables and takes a little more planning.

The first step, and perhaps the most important, is to evaluate the characteristics of the sport and to assess the athlete’s physical profile.

Evaluating The Sport
Ultimately, a resistance training program should mirror the movement patterns of the sport as closely as possible. While early stages of the program may focus on developing a general strength base, as the competitive season approaches, conditioning exercises become more specifically tailored to the sport.

The same applies to the physiological demands of the sport – a cross country runner for example, requires high levels of muscular endurance. A volleyball player would benefit from explosive power and a football lineman from exceptional muscle mass. A hockey player would benefit from basic strength, explosive power and strength endurance.

Assessing The Athlete
A conditioning plan is only as successful as the individual’s ability to commit toexecute it. For most, training time is limited so the key is to prioritize. Although in an ideal scenario a soccer player would benefit from addressing explosive power and strength endurance needs, if they lack in physical size and strength that may be their greatest hindrance. A program to bulk that player up may have the greatest impact on their performance. Resisted movements of a specific sport will only work if the non-resisted movement is done with proper form. If a player cannot perform a proper squat then resisting the exercise is counter productive. At Peak One we will run testing for evaluation before starting any resistence training.

Here are some examples of resistence training used by Peak One Performance:

Multi Directional Movement Training with Resistance Week 1

  1. Running & Back Peddling  5 times 3 sets (Nose over toes, move hands)
  2. Running & Shuffling  5 times 2 sets each side (Nose over toes, move hands)
  3. Shuffling & Back Peddling  5 times 2 sets each side (Nose over toes, move hands)
  4. Carioca & Back Peddling  5 times 2 sets each side (Nose over toes, move hands)

Contrast Sets: repeat all above exercises for 1 set w/out resistance

Linear Speed Training with Resistance Week 1

  1. Running w/ resistance Harness  5-10 yards 5 times 4 sets
  2. Contrast Sets: repeat all above exercises for 1 set w/out resistance 

Sport Specific Plyometric Exercises with Resistance Week 1

  1. Baseball:
    1. Infield drill 5 -10 yards
    2. Outfield drill 15-20 yards
    3. Bat Speed Drills
    4. Pitching with resistance
    5. Base Running
  2. Soft-Ball:
    1. Infield drill 5 -10 yards
    2. Outfield drill 15-20 yards
    3. Bat Speed Drills
    4. Pitching with resistance
  3. Lacrosse:
    1. Poke Check w/resistance
    2. Slap Check w/resistance
    3. Lift Check w/resistance
    4. Cradle/receive/pass
    5. Switching Hands

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